From College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, North Carolina State University. North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
by Connie Fisk, Benny Boodworth, Bill Cline and Whit Jones




Muscadine Grape Air-layering Technique


Air layering is best accomplished when the vine is actively growing (May to August, as with cuttings). First, cut off the bottom of a plastic soda bottle . Leave the shoot attached to the parent vine, and thread the growing point through the cut end of the bottle and out through the cap-end opening. Scarring the shoot helps the air layering process. Use a pocket knife to scrape down one side of the shoot to the cambium along the section that will be submerged in the mix. Fill the bottle with a pine bark propagation mix, such as a 1:1:1 mix of peat: sand: bark, and wet with room temperature water.

“Air layering” with plastic soda bottles
“Air layering” with plastic soda bottles

By fall, roots can be seen at the edge of the bottle
By fall, roots can be seen at the edge of the bottle

Rainwater usually suffices to keep the mix wet, but check occasionally and hand water as needed. After the vine goes dormant in the fall, remove the shoot from the parent vine and cut into rooted sections. These can then be potted or stored bare root in a refrigerated area (40ºF to 45ºF) to await planting the following spring.


Further Reading
Propagating Muscadine Grapes from the North Carolina University Extension pdf 8 pages



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Bibliography

Fisk, Connie, Boodworth, Benny, Cline, Bill and Jones, Whit. "Propagating Muscadine Grapes". ces.ncsu.edu. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, North Carolina State University. North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service. Web. 18 Aug. 2016.

Published 18 Aug. 2016 LR
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