Guava Pests
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Adult female Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew)
Fig. 1
Adult female Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew)

Adult redbanded thrips, Selenothrips rubrocinctus (Giard)
Fig. 5 
Adult redbanded thrips, Selenothrips rubrocinctus (Giard)

Adult Cardin's whiteflies, Metaleurodicus cardini (Back)
Fig. 8
Adult Cardin's whiteflies

Guava (Psidium guajava): Fruit fly injury. The fruit pulp becomes soft and discolored
Fig. 12
Guava (Psidium guajava): Fruit fly injury. The fruit pulp becomes soft and discolored

Guava (Psidium sp.): Prob. mites feeding injury
Fig. 12
Guava (Psidium sp.): Prob. mites feeding injury

Guava: Scales, ants and sooty mold
Fig. 12 magnifying glass
Scales, ants and sooty mold

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Guava trees are attacked by a number of insect pests including the Caribbean fruit fly, guava whitefly, red-banded thrips, guava fruit moth, and scales. 1

Caribbean fruit fly
Anastrepha suspensa

The Caribbean fruit fly is the most important pest of guava in Florida. Fruit infested with fly larvae are usually unsuitable for eating. Covering the developing fruit when it reaches about 1 inch in diameter with a paper bag will prevent fruit fly infestation. For more information and control measures, consult your county agricultural extension agent. 1
Use of Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Fig. 3) is planned as part of a two-pronged attack on the Caribbean fruit fly involving the release of parasites and sterile Caribbean fruit flies.

Larva(e) The endoparasitic braconid wasp, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead), parasitizing larvae of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) Distribution of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), in Florida.
Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4

Fig. 2. Caribbean fruit fly Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) Larva(e)
Fig. 3. The endoparasitic braconid wasp, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead), parasitizing larvae of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), ovipositing into fly larva in guava. Fig. 4. Distribution of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), in Florida.

Further Reading

Caribbean Fruit Fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) from the University of Florida pdf 8 pages
A Parasitoid Wasp, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata from the University of Florida pdf


Guava fruit fly
Anastrepha striata Schiner

The guava fruit fly, Anastrepha striata Schiner, is one of the most common species of fruit flies throughout most of its range. However, it has not acquired a well-established common name as have others such as the Mexican, Caribbean, and Mediterranean fruit flies. This probably is because it is not considered to be of primary economic importance, although it often is abundant and may be highly destructive to dooryard plantings of some tropical fruits. 6
This species is found in Mexico (north to southern Sinaloa, Aguascalientes and northern Veracruz) and south to Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil. In the West Indies, it is found in Trinidad (White and Elson-Harris 1994). A few specimens have been collected in the United States (southern Texas and California), but Anastrepha striata is not currently established there (Norrbum 2001). 6

Further Reading
Guava Fruit Fly, Anastrepha striata Schiner from the University of Florida pdf



Red-banded thrips
Selenothrips rubrocinctus
(Giard)
Insecta: Thysanoptera: Thripidae
Synonyms: Heliothrips rubrocinctus Giard, Physopus rubrocinctus Giard (1901), Heliothrips (Selenothrips) decolor Karny, Heliothrips (Selenothrips) mendex Schmutz, Brachyurothrips indicus Bagnall

Red-banded thrips attack guava leaves causing defoliation and attack fruit causing a browning (russetting) of the peel. Guava plants should be inspected for this pest during the summer and fall. 1
The redbanded thrips, Selenothrips rubrocinctus (Giard), was first described from Guadeloupe West Indies, where is was causing considerable damage to cacao. As a result, it was referred to as the Cacao or cocoa thrips. The earliest report relating to this thrips was a report by W.E. Broadway in 1898, when he called attention to the "blight" of cacao. 3


Adult and Larvae Pupa(e)
Fig. 6
Adults and larvae 
Fig. 7
Pupa(e)

Further Reading

Redbanded Thrips, Selenothrips rubrocinctus from the University of Florida pdf 4 pages



Guava whitefly
Metaleurodicus cardini

Insecta: Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae: Aleurodicinae

This insect is also known as Cardin's whitefly. This whitefly has been identified in Florida since 1917, from southern Florida to as far north as Gainesville. However, it is much more common in the subtropical areas of the state. Guava whitefly is usually innocuous, but under conditions that disrupt the parasite/predator complex, it can become a damaging pest. 5
The adult guava whitefly is greenish yellow with a fine dusting of white wax. The wings are dusky with a conspicuous dark spot near the center of each wing. As females deposit eggs, a fine trail of fluffy white wax is rubbed from a tuft of wax on the ventral side of the abdomen. 4

An infestation of Cardin's whitefly, Metaleurodicus cardini (Back) Fluffy wax trails, especially along leaf veins, deposited by adult females of the Cardin's whitefly, Metaleurodicus cardini (Back). Eggs of the Cardin's whitefly, Metaleurodicus cardini (Back)
Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11

Fig. 9. An infestation of Cardin's whitefly, Metaleurodicus cardini (Back)
Fig. 10. Fluffy wax trails, especially along leaf veins, deposited by adult females of the Cardin's whitefly
Fig. 11. Eggs of the Cardin's whitefly, Metaleurodicus cardini (Back)

Further Reading

Cardin’s Whitefly, Metaleurodicus cardini from the University of Florida pdf 4 pages



Guava moth
Argyresthia eugeniella

The larvae of this moth tunnel into the fruit making it inedible and feed on the leaves. Larvae have a whitish color with a black colored head. Covering the fruit with a paper bag and spraying approved biological control agents may decrease the damage caused by this pest. 1
Although not as damaging as the Caribbean fruit fly, the larvae of this moth spoil ripe fruit by tunneling through it. The larvae are whitish with black heads. They become pink as they approach maturity and attain a length of nearly one-quarter inch. 5



Further Reading
A guide to Scale Insect Identification from the University of Florida pdf 5 pages
Florida Crop/Pest Management Profile: Guava and Wax Jambu from the University of Florida pdf 5 pages (archived)
Guava Growing in the Florida Landscape from the University of Florida pdf 7 pages
Sooty mold from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Cooperative Extension Service pdf 6 pages


Bibliography

1 Crane, Jonathan H. and Balerdi, Carlos F. "Guava growing in the Florida Home Landscape." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is HS 4, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension. First printed 1968  Revised Nov. 2016. Web. 12 Feb. 2017.
2 Weems, H. V., Heppner, Jr., J. B., Fasulo, T. R. and Nation, J. L. "Caribbean Fruit Fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) (Insecta: Diptera: Tephritidae)." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is EENY-196 (originally published as DPI Entomology Circulars 38 and 260), one of a series of Featured Creatures from the Entomology and Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Published Mar. 2001. Reviewed July 2014. Web. 23 Apr. 2017.
3 Denmark, H.A. and Wolfenbarge, D.O. "Redbanded thrips Selenothrips rubrocinctus (Giard)."edis.ifas.ufl.edu. One of a series of Featured Creatures from the Entomology and Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. June 1999. Revised May 2016. Web. 12 Feb. 2017.
4 Hamon, Avas B., Fasulo, Thomas R. and Buss, Lyle J. "Cardin’s Whitefly, Metaleurodicus cardini." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. One of a series of Featured Creatures from the Entomology and Nematology Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Published Sept. 2000. Revised July 2014. Web. 8 Mar. 2015.
5 Mossler, Mark A. and Crane, Jonathan. "Florida Crop/Pest Management Profile: Guava and Wax Jambu." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is CIR 1415 one of a series of the Environmental Horticulture Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Publication date, Sept. 2002. Original authors included O. Norman Nesheim, professor, Food Science and Human Nutrition Department. This publication was revised Aug. 2009. Reviewed Aug. 2012. Web. 9 Dec. 2014.
6 Weems Jr., H. V. and T. R. Fasulo. "Guava Fruit Fly, Anastrepha striata Schiner (Insecta: Diptera: Tephritidae)." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is EENY-265 (originally published as DPI Entomology Circular 245), one of a series of Featured Creatures from the Entomology and Nematology Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Published Jan.2002. Revised Aug. 2015. Web. 30 June 2017.

Photographs

Fig. 1 Lotz, Jeffrey. Caribbean Fruit Fly (female). 2005. Florida Department of Agriculture. commons.wikimedia.org. Web. 2 Feb. 2014.
Fig.Caribbean fruit fly Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) larvae. 2010. Florida Division of Plant Industry Archive, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. bugwood.org. Web. 2 Feb. 2014.
Fig.3 Lotz, Jeffrey. The endoparasitic braconid wasp, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead), parasitizing larvae of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew). N. d. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Division of Plant Industry. 7 Mar. 2015.
Fig.4 Steck, G. J. and Sutton, B. D. Distribution of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), in Florida. N.d. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Division of Plant Industry. Web. 7 Mar. 2015.
Fig. 5.6.7 Buss, Lyle. Adult redbanded thrips, Selenothrips rubrocinctus (Giard). 2010. University of Florida. bugwood.org. Web. 7 Mar. 2015.
Fig. 8,9,10,11 Buss, Lyle. Cardin’s Whitefly, Metaleurodicus cardini. N.d. University of Florida. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Web. 8 Mar. 2015.
Fig. 12 Nelson, Scot. Guava (Psidium sp.): Fruit fly injury. The fruit pulp becomes soft and discolored. 2008. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.
Fig. 13 Nelson, Scot. Guava (Psidium guajava): Prob. mites feeding injury. 2014. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.
Nelson, Scot. Guava: Scales, ants and sooty mold. 2015. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Published 7 Mar. 2015 LR. Last update 30 June 2017 LR
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