Mango Varieties



It is generally accepted that there are two main types of mango, the Indian and the Indochinese.
Indian Types typically have monoembryonic seeds and often highly colored fruit. The fruit tend to be more susceptible to anthracnose and internal breakdown. Most commercial Florida varieties are of this type.
Indochinese Types typically have polyembryonic seeds and fruit often lack attractive coloration (i.e., they are green, light green, or yellow). The fruit tend to be relatively resistant to anthracnose. Florida varieties of this group are not commercially important, although some are appreciated in home plantings.
In many areas of the tropics, there are seedling mangos which do not clearly fit in either of these types. Some of these are 'Turpentine', 'Number 11', 'Madame Francis', and 'Kensington'.
There are many mango varieties available in south Florida and many are appropriate for small and large home landscapes. Some characteristics of the most important Florida varieties are summarized in Table 1. 1


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* = 'Condo' Mango

'Apple'
'Alampur Baneshan' 'Alice' 'Alphonso'
Fig. 1
'Apple'
(Philippines)
Fig. 2
'Alampur Baneshan' *
(India)
Fig. 3
'Alice'
(South Florida)
Fig. 4
'Alphonso'
July-Aug.
(India, Pakistan, Ecuador, Egypt, Sudan, US)

Fig. 4. Alphonso. "King of Mangoes", very sweet with fiberless pulp, rich in vitamin A and C, founded mainly in Devgad & Ratnagiri Districts of Maharashtra, India. This cultivar is available in Feb till end of May. 2

'Anderson' "Angie" 'Ataulfo' 'Bailey's Marvel' 'Banganapalli'
Fig. 5
'Anderson'
(Florida)
Fig. 6
'Angie'
(South Florida)
Fig. 7
'Ataulfo'
(Mexico)
Fig. 8
'Bailey Marvel'
Aug./Sept.
(Southwest Florida)
Fig. 9
'Banganapalli'
(South India)

Fig. 9. Banganapalli. The largest volume mango cultivar in the world, this medium-large fruit ripens to a golden-yellow exterior and a straw-yellow to golden-yellow interior. Very juicy, slightly tangy with little or no fiber and a creamy texture. It originates from the erstwhile princely state of Banganapalle, in present-day Andhra Pradesh, India. 2

'Bennet Alphonso' 'Baptiste' 'Beverly' 'Black' 'Bombay'
Fig. 10
'Bennet Alphonso'
Fig. 11
'Baptiste'
(Haiti)
Fig. 12 'Beverly'
June/July
(South Florida)
Fig. 13 'Black'
(Jamaica)
Fig. 14
'Bombay'
June
(Jamaica)

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* = 'Condo' Mango

'Brahm Kai Meu' 'Brooks' 'Cac' 'Cambodiana' 'Carabao' 'Carrie'
Fig. 15
'Brahm Kai Meu'
June-July
(Thailand)
Fig. 16
'Brooks'
(South Florida)
Fig. 17
'Cac'
Fig. 18
'Cambodiana'
(Cambodia)
Fig. 19
'Carabao'
(Philippine)
Fig. 20
'Carrie' *
June-July
(South Florida)

Fig. 19. Carabao. The Queen of Mangoes, Philippine Mango was confirmed by the Guinness Book of World Records as the world’s sweetest Mango. The Ataulfo (mango) and Manilita mango cultivars originated from the Philippine Mango variety. It can be traced back in the Manila-Mexico galleon trade in the years 1600-1800's. It was also known then as Manila Super-Mango. 2

'Casturi' 'Chaunsa' 'Choc Anon' "Coconut Cream' 'Cogshall'
Fig. 21
'Casturi'
Fig. 22
'Chaunsa'
(Sindh, Pakistan)
Fig. 23
'Choc Anon' (Miracle)
(Thailand, India,
Bangladesh, Pakistan)
Fig. 24
'Coconut Cream'
Fig. 25
'Cogshall' *
June-July
(Southwest Florida)
'Cushman' 'Dawn' 'Dot' 'Dominica' 'Du Dus'
Fig. 26
'Cushman'
July/Aug.
(South Florida)
Fig. 27
'Dawn'
(Naples, Fl.)
Fig. 28
'Dot'
June-July-Aug.
(South Florida)
Fig. 29
'Dominica'
Fig. 30
'Du Dus'

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* = 'Condo' Mango

'Duncan' 'Early Gold' 'East Indian' 'Edward' 'Eldon'
Fig. 31
'Duncan'
July/Aug.
(South Florida)
Fig. 32
'Earlygold'
(South Florida)
Fig. 33
'East Indian'
(Jamaica)
Fig. 34
'Edward'
May/June/July
(South Florida)
Fig. 35
'Eldon'
(Florida)
"Elephant' 'Excellent' 'Fascell' 'Fairchild' 'Florigon' 'Ford'
Fig. 36
'Elephant'
Fig. 37
'Excellent'
Fig. 38
'Fascell'
Fig. 39
'Fairchild' *
June-July
(Central America, Panama)
Fig. 40
'Florigon'
May/June/July
(South Florida)
Fig. 41
'Ford'

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* = 'Condo' Mango

'Fralan' 'Gao Lim Krong' 'Gawiakle' 'Glenn' 'Golden Lippins'
Fig. 42
'Fralan'
Fig. 43
'Gao Lim Krong'
Fig. 44
'Gawiakle'
Fig. 45
'Glenn'
Fig. 47
'Golden Lippins'
'Gouveia' 'Graham' 'Hayden' 'Hatcher' "Heidi'
Fig. 48
'Gouveia'
(Hawaii)
Fig. 49
'Graham'*
June/July/Aug.
(Trinidad)
Fig. 50
'Haden'
June/July
(Florida)
Fig. 51
'Hatcher'
Fig. 52
'Heidi'
(South Africa)
'Himsagar'
'Hindi' 'Hindi Bessenara' 'Ice Cream' 'Imam Pasand' 'Irwin'
Fig. 53
'Himsagar'
(Indian Subcontinent)
Fig. 54
'Hindi'
Fig. 55
'Hindi Bessenara'
(Egypt)
Fig. 56
'Ice Cream' *
June-July
(Trinidad, Tobago)
Fig. 57
'Imam Pasand'
June-July
(India)
Fig. 58
'Irwin' *
June-July
(Mexico,Equador,
Peru)

Fig. 58. Irwin. In Japan this variety is marketed as Apple Mango, and in the case of imports from Japan one needs to take care not to confuse it with the Apple Mango grown in the Philippines. 2

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* = 'Condo' Mango

'Itamaraca Red' 'Ivory' "Jakarta' 'Jaquline' 'Jean Ellen'
'Julie'
Fig. 59
'Itamaraca Red'
(Brazil)
Fig. 60
'Ivory'
(China)
Fig. 61
'Jakarta'
June-Aug.
(Java, Singapore)
Fig. 62 
'Jaquline'
Fig. 63
'Jean Ellen'
Fig. 64
'Julie' *
June-July-Aug.
(Jamaica)

Fig. 60. Ivory. Also known as the Jingu Ivory mango, or Ivory mango, this long, thin mango is named for its resemblance to a young elephant's tusk. It has thin skin, smooth skin. The flesh contains very few fibers, and constitutes approximately 82 percent of the fruit. It was first introduced into Yunnan, China from Thailand in 1914. The actual tree that was the first to be imported still grows, and during one year produced almost 500 kg of fruit. 3

'Jose' 'Keitt' 'Kensington Pride' 'Kent' 'Keo Sevoy' 'Lancetilla'
Fig. 65
'Jose'
(Reunion Island, Indian Ocean)
Fig. 66
'Keitt'
Late July/Oct.
(South Florida)
Fig. 67
'Kensington Pride'
Early to Mid-Nov.
(Australia)
Fig. 68
'Kent'
Aug./Sept.
(South Florida)
Fig. 69
'Keo Sevoy'
Fig. 70
'Lancetilla' *
Aug.-Sept.
(Honduras)
'Langra Benarsi' 'Lemon Meringue' 'Lemon Saigon' 'Lemon Zest' 'Lippens' 'Madame Francis'
Fig. 71
'Langra Benarsi'
(Pakistan, India)
Fig. 72
'Lemon Meringue'
June-July
(Burma)
Fig. 73
'Lemon Saigon'
Fig. 73
'Lemon Zest'
aka 27-1
Fig. 74
'Lippens'
Fig. 75
'Madame Francis'
June-July
(Haiti)

Fig. 75. Madame Francis. Large kidney shaped mango that ripens to a golden yellow colour with piquant flesh Commonly exported to the United States in spring; often a feature of NYC fruit stands. 2

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* = 'Condo' Mango

'Maha Chinook' 'Mallika' 'Manilita' 'Manalagi' 'Mandalay Yin Guay'
Fig. 76
'Maha Chinook'
Season is long
(Singapore)
Fig. 77
'Mallika' *
June-July
(India)
Fig. 78
'Manilita' *
Early Season
(Mexico)
Fig. 79
'Manalagi'
(Indonesia)
Fig. 80
'Mandalay Yin Guay'
(Myanmar)
'Mabruka' 'Mamme' 'Martin' 'Mendoza' 'Merk'
Fig. 81
'Mabruka'
Fig. 82
'Mamme'
Fig. 83
'Martin'
Fig. 84
'Mendoza'
Fig. 85
'Merk'
'Miami Late' 'Mulgoba' 'Mun Kun Si' 'Nam Doc Mai' 'Namoi' 'Nam Tam Teen'
Fig. 86
'Miami Late'
Fig. 87
'Mulgoba'
Fig. 88
'Mun Kun Si'
(Thailand)
Fig. 89
'Nam Doc
Mai' *
June/July
(Thailand)
Fig. 90
'Namoi'
Fig. 91
'Nam Tam Teen'
(Thailand)
'Neelum' 'Nu Wun Chan' 'Okrung' 'Ono' 'Osteen' 'Page'
Fig. 92
'Neelum' *
Late season
(South India)
Fig. 94
'Nu Wun Chan'
Fig. 95
'Okrung'
Late May/June
(Thailand)
Fig. 96
'Ono'
Fig. 97
'Osteen'
Fig. 98  
'Page'

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* = 'Condo' Mango

'Paheri' 'Palmer' 'Parvin' 'Pedda Rasam' 'Parris' 'Pascual'
Fig. 99
'Paheri'
Fig. 100
'Palmer'
July/Aug.
(South Florida)
Fig. 101
'Parvin'
July/Aug.
(South West Florida)
Fig. 102
'Pedda Rasam'
(Indian State of Andhra Pradesh)
Fig. 103
'Parris'
Fig. 104
'Pascual'
'Peach' 'Pettigrew' 'Philippine' 'Pickering' 'Pillsbury' 'Pim Seng Mun' 'Pope'
Fig. 105
'Peach'
Fig. 106
'Pettigrew'
Fig. 107
'Philippine'
June-July
(Philippines)
Fig. 108
'Pickering' *
July
Fig. 109
'Pillsbury'
Fig. 110
'Pim Sen Mun'
June-July
(Thailand)
Fig. 111
'Pope'
'Po Piju Kalay' 'Pram Kai Mia' 'Pruter' 'Rockdale Saigon' 'Rosigold'
Fig. 112
'Po Piju Kalay'
(Burma)
Fig. 113  
'Pram Kai Mia'
(Brahm Kai Meu)
Fig. 114
'Pruter'
Fig. 115
'Rockdale Saigon'
Fig. 117
'Rosigold'
March/June
(Southeast Asia)

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* = 'Condo' Mango

'Royal Special' 'Ruby' 'Saber' 'Saigon' 'San Felipe'
Fig. 118
'Royal Special'
Fig. 119  
'Ruby'
July/Aug.
(South Florida)
Fig. 120 
'Saber'
Fig. 121
'Saigon'
May/June/July
(Southeast Asia)
 Fig. 122
'San Felipe'
(Cuba)
'Sandershaw' 'Sensation' 'Simmons' 'Sindhri'
Fig. 123
'Sandershaw'
 Fig. 124
'Sensation'
July/Aug.
(South Florida)
Fig. 125
'Simmons'
Fig. 126
'Sindhri'
(Pakistan)

Fig. 126. Sindhi Mango cultivated in Sindhri town Mirpur Khas district, Sindh province of Pakistan 2

'Si Siam' 'Sophie Fry' 'Southern Blush' 'Spirit of '76' 'Springfels' 'Sung Mun' 'Suwon Tip'
Fig. 127 
'Si Siam'
Fig. 128
'Sophie Fry'
Fig. 129 
'Southern Blush'
June-July
(Mexico, Brazil,
Ecuador, Peru)
Fig. 130 
'Spirit of '76'
June-July
(South Florida)
Fig. 131
'Springfels'
July/Aug.
(South Florida)
Fig. 132
'Sung Mun'
Fig. 133
'Suwon Tip'
(Thailand)

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* = 'Condo' Mango

'Tahar' 'Tommy Atkins' 'Tom Dang' 'Tong Dam' 'Tom Py Kan' 'Torbett'
Fig. 134
'Tahar'
(Israel)
Fig. 135
'Tommy Atkins'
June/July
Fig. 136
'Tom Dang'
Fig. 137
'Tong Dam'
(Thailand)
Fig. 138  
'Tom Py Kan'
Fig. 139
'Torbert'
June-July
(Florida)

Fig. 135. One of the most commonly sold mangoes in the world. has extremely long shelf life. Hard and oblong exterior. 2

'Turby' 'Turpentine' 'Valencia Pride' "Van Dyke' 'Vellenato'
Fig. 140 
'Turby'
Fig. 141
'Turpentine'
Fig. 142 
'Valencia Pride'
July-Aug.
(South Florida)
Fig. 143 
'Van Dyke'
June-July
(South Florida)
Fig. 144
'Vellenato'
(Columbia)
'Webber' 'Zill' 'Wise'
Fig. 145
'Webber'
Fig. 146 
'Zill'
June-July
(South Florida)
Fig. 147 
'Wise'

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Further Reading
Mango Varieties Available in Florida ext. link
Dr. Crane goes through a variety of mangos, describing attributes and characteristics for each.
Birthplace of Dashehari Mango from Biodiversity International pdf
The rarest of rare mango in Malihabad from Biodiversity International pdf



Back to
Mango Page


Bibliography

1 Crane, Jonathan H., Balerdi, Carlos F. and Maguire, Ian. "Mangos Growing in the Florida Home Landscape". edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Publication date Apr. 1994. Reviewed July 2013. Web. 19 June 2014.
2 List of Mango Cultivars. wikipedia.org. Web. 4 Apr. 2016.
3 List of Mango Cultivars. wikipedia.org. Mango-Yunnan Tourism Website. En.ynta.gov.cn. Web. 5 Apr. 2016.

Photographs

Fig. 1 Fir0002/Flagstaffotos. Mangos of the Kensington Pride cultivar. N.d. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 4 Apr. 2016.
Fig. 2,4,12,13,15,17,20,21,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,33,36,37,39,40,42,43,44,47,51,52,56,57,58,61,62,64,66,69,70,72,73,75,76,77,78,88,89,90,92,94,95,
98,100,107,109,110,113,117,120,121,122,127,129,130,131,135,138,139,140,142,144,146,147 
Mango, Mangifera indica. N.d. Top Tropicals Tropical Plant Catalog. toptropicals.com. Web. 19 June 2014.
Fig. 7 Mangostar. Ataulfo mango, grown in Soconusco, Mexico. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 4 Apr. 2016.
Fig. 9 Chander, Siva. Banganapalli. Banganapalli mangoes, illustrating variations in shape and size commonly found. 2015. commons.wikimedia.org.  (CC BY-SA 4.0). Web. 4 Apr. 2016.
Fig. 3,8,10,11,16,18,19,30,31,34,35,38,41,53,54,55,59,60,67,71,74,80,81,82,84,85,86,87,91,96,97,101,102,106,111,112,114,115,118,119,124,
125,128,132,133,134,136,137,141,143
Ghosh, Asit K, Thaumaturgist. Display of the 'Bailey's Marvel', 'Bennet Alphonso', 'Baptiste', 'Brooks', 'Cambodiana', 'Carabao', 'Carrie', 'Duncan', 'Du Dus', 'Eldon', 'Edward', 'Fascell', 'Ford', 'Gouveia', 'Himsagar', 'Hindi', 'Hindi Bessenara', 'Itamaraca Red', 'Lippens', 'Mandalay Yin Guay', 'Mulgoba', 'Nam Tam Teen','Ono', 'Osteen', 'Parvin', 'Pedda Rasam', 'Pope', 'Po Pyu Kalay', 'Pruter', 'Rockdale Saigon', 'Royal Special', 'Ruby', 'Sensation', Sophie Fry', 'Sung Mun','Suwon Tip', 'Tahar', 'Tom Dang', 'Tong Dam', 'Turpentine', 'Van Dyke' mangos at the Redland Summer Fruit Festival.  2007-2010. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0) and GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2. Fruit & Spice Park, Homestead, Florida. Web. 5 Apr. 2016.
Fig. 6,32,63 Squam256. 'Angie','Early Gold', 'Jean Ellen' mangos. 2007-2010. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). International Mango Festival at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Miami, Florida. Web. 7 Apr. 2016.
Fig. 5,14,45,49,50,68,99,103,104,105,123,145 Maguire, Ian. Mango Series. 2011. trec.ifas.ufl.edu. From the Tropical Fruit Photography Picture Archive. Web. 28 July 2014.
Fig. 22 Zai, Jahanzaib. Chaunsa Mango, a famous variety of mango in Pakistan. 2005. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 2 Apr. 2016.
Fig. 65 Tuttle, Archibald. José mango (from Réunion island). Deux mangues de la variété réunionnaise 'José'. 2010. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 5 Apr. 2016.
Fig. 79 Midori, Sakurai. Manalagi mangoes, Taman Wisata Mekarsari, West Java, Indonesia. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0) and GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2. Web. 5 Apr. 2016.
Fig. 126 Mahmood, Khalid.  Sindhri, famous mango variety from Pakistan and Among the Best Tasted Mangoes of the World. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under  (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 5 Apr. 2016.

Published 19 June 2014 LR. Last update Apr. 2016 LR
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