Papaya Injuries and Other Symptoms
Back to
Papaya Page

Papaya freckles
Fig. 1 
Freckles on papaya

Lightning injury
Fig. 2
Lightning injury

Variegation of papaya
Fig. 8
Variegation of papaya (Carica papaya), a non-pathogenic physiological disorder or mutation.

Variegated Leaf
Fig. 9
Variegation of papaya (Carica papaya), a non-pathogenic physiological disorder or mutation.

Cockroach Damage to Stem
Fig. 10
Cockroach damage to stem

Herbicide Damage
Fig. 11
Herbicide damage

Carpellody or "cat-face" Fruits
Fig. 12
Carpellody or "cat-face" fruits

Injury to fruit
Fig. 21
Such scarring of papaya fruits could result from one or more of several different causes, including spider mites feeding injury, sun scald, or pesticide spray injury and/or phytotoxicity. The expression os symptoms may also be papaya-variety dependent.

Back to
Papaya Page

Freckles
Non-pathogenic Disorder (Fig.1)

Freckles are initially noticed as small pinpoint spots on fruits that are half developed. As the fruit matures the spots slowly increase in size up to about 13 mm in diameter. However, the spots usually do not increase beyond 4 mm in diameter. The spots are brown in color, have a reticulated pattern, and may have a water-soaked margin. The centers of large spots may attain a grayish color.
Freckles are usually limited to the exposed surface of the fruit facing away from the stem. They occur throughout the year but appear to be more prevalent during seasons or periods when sunny days prevail. Freckles are superficial and do not affect the flesh and are, therefore, primarily a cosmetic disorder.
Fruits that are covered with pollination bags soon after formed remain free of freckles at harvest. 1



Lightning Injuries

Wilting of Leaves Caused by LightningInternal Burn of Stem
Internal Burn of StemLightning injury to papaya (Carica papaya).
Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5
External stem damage
Internal Fruit Damage
Fig. 6 Fig. 7

Fig.2. External fruit symptoms
Fig.3. Wilting of plant
Fig.4. Internal burn of stem
Fig.5. Internal burn of fruit pedicel
Fig.6. External stem burn
Fig.7. Internal fruit damage

Further Reading
Lightning Injury to Plants from the University of Hawaiii pdf 5 pages



Catface or Carpellody

"Cat face" or carpellody is specific to papaya. The appearance of carpellodic fruits can range from those that resemble female fruits to those that are severely deformed with longitudinal ridges or seams. Carpellodic fruits are generally rounded rather than the more typical pyriform shape and are unmarketable.
Carpellody or "cat-face" fruits result when stamens develop abnormally into carpel-like fleshy structures.
Sex expression in hermaphroditic papaya trees is variable and is influenced by environmental factors. The development of carpellodic fruits is favored by low night temperatures in combination with high moisture and nitrogen levels.
Carpellody is an inherited trait thus careful seed selection can reduce its occurrence. 2

Carpellody of papaya fruit, a physiological disorder (not pathogenic)
Catface (carpellody) of papaya: physiological disorder
Fig. 13 Fig. 14

Fig. 13. Carpellody of papaya fruit, a physiological disorder (not pathogenic)
Fig. 14. Catface (carpellody) of papaya: physiological disorder



Other Types of Injuries

Hurricane damage to papayaBoron deficiency of papaya (Carica papaya)Boron deficiency of papaya(Carica papaya): lumpy fruitsPapaya: Birds feeding injury to fruit
Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18

Papaya: LatexosisPapaya: Iron (Fe) deficiency
Fig. 19 Fig. 20

Fig. 15. Hurricane damage to papaya
Fig. 16. Boron deficiency of papaya (Carica papaya)
Fig. 17. Boron deficiency of papaya(Carica papaya): lumpy fruits
Fig. 18. Papaya: Birds feeding injury to fruit
Fig. 19. Papaya: Latexosis
Fig. 20. Papaya: Iron (Fe) deficiency

Further Reading
Boron Deficiency in Papaya from the University of Hawai'i pdf 4 pages
Bibliography

1 Nishijima, Wayne. "Freckles on Papaya." extento.hawaii.edu. Knowlegde Master, Extension Entomology & University of Hawaii-CTAHR Integrated Pest Management Program. Jan. 1993. Web. 11 Apr. 2014.
2 Nishijima, Wayne. "Carpellodyor Cat Face, papaya." extento.hawaii.edu. Knowlegde Master, Extension Entomology & University of Hawaii-CTAHR Integrated Pest Management Program. Jan. 1993. Web. 11 Apr. 2014.

Photographs

Fig. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 Nelson, Scot C. Papaya (Carica papaya). Pest and Disease Image Gallery. N.d. hawaiiplantdisease.net. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 11 Apr. 2014.
Fig. 13 Carpellody of papaya fruit, a physiological disorder (not pathogenic). 2006.
Fig. 14 Nelson, Scot C.  Catface (carpellody) of papaya: physiological disorder. 2007. Pest and Disease Image Gallery. University of Hawaii. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 19 Fev. 2017. Pest and Disease Image Gallery. University of Hawaii.  flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 20 Fev. 2017.
Fig. 15 Nelson, Scot C.  Hurricane damage to papaya (Carica papaya). 2011. Pest and Disease Image Gallery. University of Hawaii.  flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 19 Fev. 2017.
Fig. 16,17 Boron deficiency of papaya (Carica papaya). 2011. Pest and Disease Image Gallery. University of Hawaii. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 20 Fev. 2017.
Fig. 18 Papaya: Birds feeding injury to fruit. 2016. Pest and Disease Image Gallery. University of Hawaii. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 20 Fev. 2017.
Fig. 19 Papaya: Birds feeding injury to fruit. 2016. Pest and Disease Image Gallery. University of Hawaii. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 20 Fev. 2017.
Fig. 20 Papaya: Birds feeding injury to fruit. 2006. Pest and Disease Image Gallery. University of Hawaii. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 20 Fev. 2017.
Fig. 21 Papaya: Iron (Fe) deficiency. 2014. Pest and Disease Image Gallery. University of Hawaii. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 20 Fev. 2017.

Published Jan. 2014 LR. Last update 19 Feb. 2017 LR
© 2013 - growables.org
about credits disclaimer sitemap updates