Persimmon Pests
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Persimmon Psylla
Fig. 1
Adult persimmon psylla
Trioza diospyri (Ashmead)

Persimmon psylla (Trioza diospyri) (Ashmead), foliage
Fig. 2
Damage to common persimmon, Diospyros virginiana, caused by infestation of the persimmon psylla, Trioza diospyri (Ashmead)

Central rolled leaf shows the damage from the persimmon psylla
Fig. 3
Central rolled leaf shows the damage from the persimmon psylla

Persimmon borer pupal case protruding from the root
Fig. 4
Persimmon borer pupal case protruding from the root

The persimmon borer larva
Fig. 5
The persimmon borer larva

Adult twig girdler and damage to twig
Fig. 9
Adult twig girdler and damage to twig


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Generally, persimmon has relatively few insect pests. Scale, persimmon psylla, twig girdlers and borers attack the tree or leaves while plant and stink bugs may attack the fruit. 2



Scales

Both soft and armored scale are pests. Soft species are: Indian wax, Ceroplastes ceriferus, Florida wax, C. floridensis, Brown soft scale, C. hesperidium, Acuminate scale, Kilifia acuminata, and European fruit leucanium, Parthenoleucanium corni. Armored scale species are Hemiberlesia rapax, Greedy scale and White peach scale, Pseudaulacaspis pentagona. All scale are controlled by the same method: monitor and when the eggs and crawlers (immatures) are present use oil or other insecticide in two applications about 10-14 days apart. Dormant oil will also control scale. 2



Persimmon psylla

Trioza diospyri (Ashmead)

Persimmon psylla is the primary leaf pest and is found attacking newly forming leaves in spring. Infested leaves appear crinkled and malformed. The white powdery covered nymphs and black bodied adults are found feeding inside the mishapen leaves which makes control difficult. Psylla infestations stunt the growth of shoots on young trees. 2

Further Reading
Persimmon Psylla, Trioza diospyri (Ashmead) from the University of Florida pdf



Persimmon clearwing borer

Sannina uroceriformis Walker

The persimmon borer, Sannina uroceriformis Walker, (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) attacks the American persimmon, Diospyros virginiana, which is its only known host. The persimmon borer is a pest because the native, American persimmon is used as the rootstock for the fruit-producing scions of the Japanese persimmon, D. kaki. This clearwing moth is found attacking native persimmon throughout the range of its host along the Atlantic Coast from New Jersey to Florida, and westward to Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Ohio, and Indiana. 1

The adult female persimmon clearwing moth. The adult male persimmon clearwing moth.
Fig. 6 Fig. 7
Damage to persimmon by the persimmon borer The pupal case of the persimmon borer
Fig. 8 Fig. 9

Fig. 6. The adult female persimmon clearwing moth
Fig. 7. The adult male persimmon clearwing moth
Fig. 8.  Damage to persimmon by the persimmon borer
Fig. 9.  The pupal case of the persimmon borer

Other species of woodboring insects and the fungus Bothryosphaeria dothidea also attack persimmon. Unlike S. uroceriformis, these species attack the Japanese persimmon scion wood. Several species of metallic wood borers in the family Buprestidae and perhaps other species of Sesiidae attack stressed or injured trees. The usual occurrence in persimmon is as follows. The fungus, B. dothidea, attacks the trees causing cankers that appear as open wounds in the external tree tissue. The adult beetles are attracted to these cankers and lay eggs in the cracks and crevasses that they provide. The beetle larvae then bore under the bark and feed in the conductive tissue, thereby girdling and killing the limbs. In persimmon trees that are not pruned and shaped properly, cracked bark that attracts the beetles may also build up in the crotches of the larger limbs and cause similar damage. 1

Further Reading
Bothryosphaeria dothidea from Forest Pest Species Profile FAO pdf 5 pages
The Persimmon Borer Sannina uroceriformis Walker from the University of Florida pdf



Twig girdlers
Oncideres cingulata

Twig girdlers attack persimmon and a variety of tree species most notably hickory and pecan. During September and October the adult female deposits her eggs by piercing the bark below the buds on terminal twigs. After oviposition the female girdles the stem which may later fall to the ground. In so doing the beetle may transmit the wilt disease Cephalosporium diospyri. Infested twigs should be gathered and destroyed. 2

Cephalosporium Wilt of Persimmon
from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services pdf



Further Reading
Insect Management in Oriental Persimmon from the University of Florida pdf
Bibliography

1 Mizell, Russell F. lll. "The Persimmon Borer Sannina uroceriformis Walker, Pest of Persimmon." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is ENY-835, one of a series of the Entomology and Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Publication date July 2006. Reviewed Aug. 2015. Web. 22 Dec. 2016.
2 Mizell, Russell F. lll and Brinen, Gary. "Insect Management in Oriental Persimmon." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is ENY-803, one of a series of the Entomology and Nematology Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Publication date Oct. 1993. Reviewed Jan. 2015. Web. 25 Apr. 2017.

Photographs

Fig. 1 Buss, Lyle. Adult Persimon Psylla, Trioza diopyri (Ashmead). N.d. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Web. 22 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 2 Payne, Jerry A. Persimmon psylla (Trioza diospyri) (Ashmead), foliage. 2003. USDA Agricultural Research Service. bugwood.org. Under (CC BY 3.0 US). Web. 22 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 3 Central rolled leaf shows the damage from the persimmon psylla. N.d. University of Florida. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Web. 22 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 4 Persimmon borer pupal case protruding from the root. N.d. University of Florida. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Web. 22 Dec. 2016. Solomon, James. The persimmon borer larva. USDA Forest Service. insectimages.org
Fig. 5 Solomon, James. The persimmon borer larva. 2010. USDA Forest Service. bugwood.org. Web. 22 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 6 Solomon, James. The Adult Female Persimmon Clearwing Moth. 2010. USDA Forest Service. bugwood.org. Web. 22 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 7 Solomon, James. The Adult Male Persimmon Clearwing Moth. 2010. USDA Forest Service. bugwood.org. Web. 22 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 8 Solomon, James. Damage to persimmon by the persimmon borer. 2010. USDA Forest Service. bugwood.org. Web. 22 Dec. 2016. Fig. 9 Payne, Jerry A. The pupal case of the persimmon borer. N.d. USDA Forest Service. bugwood.org. Web. 22 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 7 Hyche, Lacy L.. Adult twig girdler and damage to twig. N.d. Auburn University. sfrc.ufl.edu. Web. 22 Dec. 2016.

Published 22 Dec. 2016 LR. Last update to 25 Apr. 2017 LR
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