Pineapple  Pests
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Pineapple scale Diaspis bromeliae (Kerner)
Fig. 1
Pineapple scale Diaspis bromeliae (Kerner)

Brown pineapple scale
Fig. 2
Brown Pineapple Scale Melanaspis bromiliae (Leonardi)

Pineapple mealybug (Dysmicoccus brevipes) (Cockerell)
Fig. 3
Pineapple mealybug (Dysmicoccus brevipes) (Cockerell)

Pineapple mealybug nymph(s)
Fig. 4
Pineapple mealybug Dysmicoccus brevipes Nymph(s)

Young female of reniform nematode
Fig. 5
Young female of reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira, with swollen body


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Mealybugs may attack the leaves and lateral, shallow roots, weakening the plant and decreasing fruit production. Ants commonly "farm" mealybugs and scales by protecting them from natural predators and moving them to new feeding sites. Controlling ants will decrease the likelihood of mealybug infestations. Scales attack the leaves of pineapple plants, which weakens the plant. To prevent scale infestations, use clean soil media to start new plants and inspect plants frequently. 1



Pineapple scale

Diaspis bromeliae (Kerner)

Brown Pineapple Scale
Melanaspis bromiliae (Leonardi)



Pineapple Mealybug
Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell)

Dysmicoccus brevipes, commonly called the pineapple mealybug (Fig. 3) or more specifically the pink pineapple mealybug, is a worldwide pest of pineapple crops and a minor pest of many other crops. Its importance as a crop pest of pineapple is tied strongly to its ability to transmit Pineapple mealybug wilt-associated virus to pineapples.
Direct feeding damages the fruit, causing chlorotic areas (areas that cannot produce enough chlorophyll), rotted bottoms, and mealybug stripe (streaks of discoloration with underlying tissue collapse). Feeding by the pineapple mealybug can weaken the plant, increasing susceptibility to other pests and diseases. Black spot, caused by a fungus, is reported on pineapple fed upon by mealybugs. Black sooty mold and other molds commonly grow in areas exposed to a buildup of honeydew produced by mealybugs. 2

Further Reading
Pineapple Mealybug, Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell) (Insecta: Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) from the University of Florida pdf 5 pages



Nematodes
Several nematodes may cause significant injury to pineapple roots including root knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and reniform (Rotylenchulus reniformis) nematodes. Symptoms include plant decline, stunted development and reduced fruit production. Plant only vigorous plant material. If possible inspect the roots for signs of nematode feeding before planting, and discard planting material with signs of infestation. The best control is not to introduce nematode-infested soil or plant material into the pineapple planting area. 1

Further Reading
Reniform Nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis Lindford and Oliveira from the University of Florida pdf 4 pages
Bibliography

1 Crane, Jonathan. "Pineapple Growing in the Florida Home Landscape". edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is HS7, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication1975. Re-written Oct. 2006. Revised November 2016. Web. 3 Mar. 2017.
2 Egelie, Ashley A.  and Gillett-Kaufman, Jennifer L. "Pineapple Mealybug, Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell)(Insecta: Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)." edis.ifas.ufl.edu.This document is EENY635, one of a series of the Entomology and Nematology Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date Oct. 2015. Web. 19 Dec. 2016.

Photographs

Fig. 1,2 Pineapple Scale Adult(s). Diaspis bromeliae (Kerner) and Brown Pineapple Scale Adult(s) Melanaspis bromiliae (Leonardi). 2006. United States National Collection of Scale Insects Photographs Archive, USDA Agricultural Research Service. bugwood.org. Under (CC BY-NC 3.0 US). Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 3 Pineapple Mealybug Dysmicoccus brevipes Adult(s), Pineapple Mealybug Dysmicoccus brevipes Nymph(s).  2006.  United States National Collection of Scale Insects Photographs Archive, USDA Agricultural Research Service. Last updated 29 June 2011. bugwood.org. Under (CC BY-NC 3.0 US). Web. 28 Jan. 2014.
Fig. 4 Pineapple Mealybug Dysmicoccus brevipes Nymph(s). 2006. United States National Collection of Scale Insects Photographs Archive, USDA Agricultural Research Service. bugwood.org. Under (CC BY-NC 3.0 US). Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 5 Wang, Koon-Hui. Young female of reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira, with swollen body.  edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

Published 28 Jan. 2014 LR. Last update 3 Mar. 2017 LR
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