Banana Pests
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Adult Banana Root Borer
Fig. 1
Banana Root Borer, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar)

Silky Cane Weevil Adult
Fig. 8
Silky cane weevil adult
Color pattern of the adult silky cane weevil, Metamasius hemipterus sericeus (Olivier)

Banana Toppling Disease Caused by Burrowing Nematodes
Fig. 11
Lodging banana plants suffering from Toppling Disease caused by the burrowing nematode, Radopholus similis

Banana Root Damage Caused by Burrowing Nematode
Fig. 12
Burrowing nematode (Radopholus similis) damage to banana roots

Adult male red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst.
Fig. 18
Adult male red palm mite,
Raoiella indica
Hirst.

Severe damage to palm caused by the red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst.
Fig. 19
Severe damage to palm caused by the red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst.

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Banana Root Borer
Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar)

The banana borer lays eggs at the base of the pseudostem and the larvae bore into the pseudostems and rhizome causing extensive damage. Young plants may be killed by extensive tunneling and mature plants may weaken and topple with a subsequent reduction in yield. Control of the pest includes use of clean (non-infested) planting material and sanitation (removal and/or grinding up old pseudostems). For more information, please contact your local Cooperative Extension Agent. 4

Banana Root Borer, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar)Banana Cosmopolites sordidus LarvaBanana Root Borer Cycle
Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4
Banana Root Borer DamageBanana Root Borer damageBanana: Corm weevils (Cosmopolites sordidus) injury to basal pseudostem
Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7

Fig. 2. Banana Root Borer, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar)
Fig. 3. Banana Cosmopolites sordidus larva
Fig. 4. Life cycle of the banana root borer, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar).
Clockwise from top right, adult, larva, pupa, and tunnels in the banana corm. 1
Fig. 5,6. Banana Root Borer damage
Fig. 7. Corm weevils (Cosmopolites sordidus) injury to basal pseudostem

Further Reading
Banana Root Borer, Cosmopolites sordidus from the University of Florida pdf 5 pages



Silky cane weevil
Metamasius hemipterus sericeus (Olivier)

The silky cane weevil causes similar damage and problems as the banana weevil. The larvae tunnel into the pseudostem, building galleries that weaken the plant. For more information, please contact your local Cooperative Extension Agent. 2

Larva of the silky cane weevil, Metamasius hemipterus sericeus (Olivier)Silky Cane Weevil Damage
Fig. 9 Fig. 10

Fig. 9. Larva of the silky cane weevil, Metamasius hemipterus sericeus (Olivier)
Fig. 10. Damage to sugarcane by the silky cane weevil, Metamasius hemipterus sericeus (Olivier)

Further Reading
Silky Cane Weevil, Metamasius hemipterus sericeus(Olivier) from the University of Florida pdf 5 pages



Nematodes
Burrowing
Radopholus similis

Symptoms of burrowing nematode are most readily observable as dark and necrotic lesions on the root system, similar to those caused by pathogenic fungi, Helicotylenchus multicinctus, and other endoparasitic nematodes that may infect banana roots. Root systems can become stunted, unthrifty, and necrotic. In banana, lesions may be present in both the roots (Fig. 12) and outer layer of the rhizome. 

Feeding of the burrowing nematode causes extensive damage to the root system and rhizome of banana. The spiral nematode causes extensive damage to the fibrous root system. Injured plants are susceptible to invasion by pathogens and toppling. Purchase and use of non-infested plant material (tissue culture plants, suckers or rhizomes) is the best control. If possible inspect the root system and base of the sucker for dead roots prior to purchasing. For more information, please contact your local Cooperative Extension Agent. 4

Corm necrosis caused by the burrowing nematodeBanana: Toppling due to Radopholus similisToppling of bananaSection of ginger infected with Rhadopholus similis
Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16
Banana roots infected by Radopholus similis
Fig. 17

Fig. 13. Corm necrosis caused by the burrowing nematode
Fig. 14. Banana: Toppling due to Radopholus similis
Fig. 15. Toppling of banana. In this case, the root system was infected with root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne sp.) and/or burrowing nematodes (Radopholus similis) and thereby compromised, necrotic and/or galled, shallow and weakened, the plant was bearing a bunch, and there was a rain storm bearing high winds
Fig. 16. Section of ginger infected with Rhadopholus similis
Fig. 17. Banana roots infected by Radopholus similis
Note dark lesions and necrotic roots induced by the nematode feeding and tunneling

Further Reading
Banana Nematodes from the American Samoa Community College, Cooperative Research and Extension pdf
Burrowing Nematode, Radopholus similis (Cobb, 1893)Thorne, 1949 from the University of Florida pdf 5 pages



Red Palm Mite
Raoiella indica Hirst (Arachnida: Acari:Tenuipalpidae)

Until recently, the Red Palm Mite pdf was found in India, Egypt, Israel, Mauritius, Reunion, Sudan, Iran, Oman, Pakistan, and the United Arab Emirates. However, in 2004, this pest was detected in Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, St. Martin, Saint Lucia, Trinidad, and Tobago in the Caribbean. In November 2006, this pest was found in Puerto Rico.
In 2007, the red palm mite was discovered in Florida. As of April 2009, this pest was in five counties: Broward, Miami-Dade, Martin, Monroe, and Palm Beach (FDACS 2009).
It is spreading rapidly and is expected to establish in other subtropical regions of the Western Hemisphere.
This mite is easily distributed by wind currents and movement of infested plants through nursery stock and cut branches of plants. It is likely to establish throughout tropical and subtropical areas throughout the Western Hemisphere. 5

Adult females of the red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst.
Symptoms of Red Palm Mite on Banana Leaves
Fig. 20 Fig. 21

Fig. 20. Adult females of the red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst.
Fig. 21 . Symptoms/damage of Red Palm Mite, Raoiella indica Hirst., on banana leaves

Further Reading
Red Palm Mite, Raoiella indica Hirst (Arachnida: Acari: Tenuipalpidae) from the University of Florida pdf 5 pages


Bibliography

1 Woodruff, Robert E. and Fasulo, Thomas R. "Banana Root Borer, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Insecta: Coleoptera: Curculionidae)." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is EENY-391 (IN706) (originally published as DPI Entomology Circular No. 88), one of a series of Featured Creatures from the Entomology and Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Published Oct. 2006. Revised May 2010 and Aug. 2015. Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
2 Weissling,Thomas J. and Giblin-Davis, Robin M. "Silky Cane Weevil, Metamasius hemipterus sericeus (Olivier) (Insecta: Coleoptera: Curculionidae)." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is EENY-053 (IN210), one of a series of Featured Creatures from the Entomology and Nematology Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Sept. 1998. Revised Aug. 2007, Aug. 2010, Sept. 2013, and Jan. 2017. Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
3 Sekora,Nicholas and Crow, William T. "Burrowing Nematode Radopholus similis (Cobb, 1893) Thorne, 1949 (Nematoda: Secernentea: Tylenchida: Pratylenchidae: Pratylenchinae)." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is EENY-542, one of a series of the Entomology and Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Oct. 2012.  Reviewed Aug. 2015. Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
4 Crane, Johathan H., Balerdi, Carlos F. and Maquire, Ian. "Bananas Growing in the Home Landscape." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is HS-10, one of a series of the Department of Horticultural Sciences, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. First printed 1972 as FC-10. Revised Jan. 1998, Dec. 2005, Oct. 2008, and Nov. 2016. Web. 14 Mar. 2017.
5 Hoy, Marjorie A.,Peña, Jorge and Nguyen, Ru. "Red Palm Mite, Raoiella indica Hirst (Arachnida: Acari: Tenuipalpidae)." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is EENY-397 (IN711), one of a series of Featured Creatures from the Entomology and Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Published Nov. 2006. Revised apr. 2010 and Aug. 2015. Web.  Web. 15 Mar. 2017.

Photographs

Fig.1,2 Giron Duque, Jennifer C. Banana root borer, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar,1824). 2010. University of Puerto Rico. bugwood.org. Web. 19 March 2014.
Fig. 3 Nelson, Scot C. Cosmopolites sordidus in Hawaii. 2005. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0).  Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
Fig. 4 McCormack G. 2006. Cosmopolites sordidus, Banana-root Borer. 2006. Cook Islands Biodiversity Database, Version 2006.1. Cook Islands Natural Heritage Trust, Rarotonga. cookislands.bishopmuseum.org. Web. 15 Aug. 2014.
Fig.5,6 Brito, Oswaldo. Banana Root Borer Damage. 2013. Independent Consultant. bugwood.org. Web. 19 March 2014.
Fig.7 Nelson, Scot C. Banana: Corm weevils (Cosmopolites sordidus) injury to basal pseudostem. 2016. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0).  Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
Fig. 8,9,10 Giblin-Davis, Robin M. Larva of the silky cane weevil, Metamasius hemipterus sericeus (Olivier). N.d. Entomology and Nematology Department, University of Florida. entnemdept.ufl.edu. Web. 15 Aug. 2014.
Fig. 11 Coyne, Danny. Banana Root Borer Radopholus similis. N.d. Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. entnemdept.ufl.edu. Web. 15 Aug. 2014. Published 19 Mar. 2014 LR. Last update 21 July 2015 LR
Fig.12 Nelson, Scot C. Burrowing nematode (Radopholus similis) damage to banana roots. 2004. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0).  Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
Fig.13 Nelson, Scot C. Corm necrosis caused by the burrowing nematode. N.d. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0).  Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
Fig.14 Nelson, Scot C. Banana: Toppling due to Radopholus similis. 2004. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0).  Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
Fig.15 Nelson, Scot C. Toppling of banana. In this case, the root system was infected with root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne sp.) and/or burrowing nematodes (Radopholus similis) and thereby compromised, necrotic and/or galled, shallow and weakened, the plant was bearing a bunch, and there was a rain storm bearing high winds. 2006. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0).  Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
Fig. 16 McClure, Michael. Section of ginger infected with Rhadopholus similis. 2010. University of Arizona. bugwood.org. Web. 15 Aug. 2014.
Fig. 17 Dunn, Robert. Banana Root Borer Radopholus similis. N.d. University of Florida, Entomology and Nematology Department. entnemdept.ufl.edu. Web. 15 Aug. 2014.
Fig. 18 Duncan, Rita. Red Palm Mite, Raoiella indica Hirst (Arachnida: Acari: Tenuipalpidae). N.d. University of Florida. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Web. 15 Aug. 2014.
Fig. 19 Pea. Jorge. Severe damage to palm caused by the red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst. N.d. University of Florida. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Web. 15 Mar. 2017.

Published 19 Mar. 2014 LR. Last update 15 Mar. 2017 LR
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