Pineapple Diseases
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Wilted plants
Fig. 1 magnifying glass
Wilted plants
caused by Phytophthora

Rotten root system
Fig. 2 magnifying glass
Rotten root system
caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi

Heart rot of pineapple (Ananas comosus) caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi
Fig. 3 magnifying glass
Heart rot of pineapple (Ananas comosus) caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi

Pineapple Phytophthora
Fig. 4
 Phytophthora parasitica causes soft rotting of the basal white leaf tissues

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Pineapple Heart/Root Rot

Pineapple root rot may be caused by various Phytophthora and Pythium species which attack and destroy the root system. Symptoms include a reduction in plant growth, development of reddish colored leaves, browning of leaf margins, and plant decline and death. Primary control is to use disease-free planting material and avoid long periods of excessive soil moisture. These rot-causing organisms may spread through the main stem and infect developing fruit as well. 1
Heart rot affects the basal leaf tissues and can rot fruit as well, while root rot causes root necrosis that, if left unaddressed, may lead to reduced crop yields and total crop failure. 3
Phytophthora root rot of pineapple caused by the pathogen Phytophthora cinnamomi causes rotting of roots and anthocyanescence (reddening or purplish coloration) of foliage. 3

Pineapple Phytophthora parasitica smooth cayenne-root rot, heart rot Pineapple Phytophthora parasitica left, thieloviopsis center, ck right, non wounded smooth cayenne Root rot of pineapple (Ananas comosus) caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi
Fig. 5 magnifying glass Fig. 6 magnifying glass Fig. 7 magnifying glass

Fig. 5. Pineapple Phytophthora parasitica smooth cayenne-root rot, heart rot
Fig. 6. Pineapple Phytophthora parasitica left, thieloviopsis center, ck right, non wounded smooth cayenne.
Fig. 7. Root rot of pineapple (Ananas comosus) caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi

Further Reading
Heart and Root Rots of Pineapple from the University of Hawaii pdf 8 pages



Mealybug Wilt of Pineapple (MWP)


Pineapple wilt is a serious disease. Disease occurs only in association with a mealybug and a closterovirus (PMWaV). Mealybugs can transmit the virus. Neither the virus nor the mealybug alone incites mealybug wilt. The virus occurs in high frequency in some clones that are planted. Other clones have a lower frequency of virus infection. Mealybug wilt is controlled by controlling the ants that tend the mealybugs. An effective ant control program makes it possible for the mealybug to be kept under control by predation by natural enemies. Ant control costs usually are less than those incurred in controlling mealybugs. 2

Pineapple: Mealybug wilt. Pathogen: Mealybug wilt virus Mealybug wilt of pineapple in Hawaii
Fig. 8 magnifying glass Fig. 9 magnifying glass

Fig. 8. Pineapple: Mealybug wilt. Pathogen: Mealybug wilt virus
Fig. 9. Mealybug wilt of pineapple in Hawaii

Further Reading
Closterovirus Infection and Mealybug Exposure Are Necessary for the Development of Mealybug Wilt of Pineapple Disease from the University of Hawaii pdf 8 pages
Pineapple Mealybug from the University of Florida pdf 5 pages

Bibliography

1 Crane, Jonathan. "Pineapple Growing in the Florida Home Landscape." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is HS7, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication 1975. Re-written Oct. 2006. Revised November 2016. Web. 3 Mar. 2017.
2 Sether, D. M. and Hu, J. S. "Closterovirus Infection and Mealybug Exposure Are Necessary for the Development of Mealybug Wilt of Pineapple Disease." ctahr.hawaii.edu. University of Hawaii at Manoa, Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, Honolulu. 2 April 2002. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.
3 Green, James and Nelson, Scot. "Heart and Root Rots of Pineapple." ctahr.hawaii.edu. University of Hawaii at Manoa, Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, Honolulu. July 2015. Web. 4 Fev. 2017.

Photographs

Fig. 1 Nelson, Scot, C. Foliar symptoms of root rot of pineapple (Ananas comosus) caused by the Phytophthora plant pathogen. 2011. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0).  Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 2 Nelson, Scot, C. Root rot of pineapple (Ananas comosus) caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi. 2011. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 3 Feb. 2017.
Fig. 3,7 Nelson, Scot, C. Heart rot of pineapple (Ananas comosus) caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi. 2011. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
Fig. 4,5 Nelson, Scot, C. Pineapple Phytophthora parasitica smooth cayenne-root rot, heart rot. 2012. University of Hawaii at Manoa.  flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 3 Feb. 2017.
Fig. 6 Nelson, Scot, C., Trujillo, E.E. Pineapple Phytophthora parasitica left, thieloviopsis center, ck right, non wounded smooth cayenne. 2012. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 3 Feb. 2017.
Fig. 8 Nelson, Scot, C. Pineapple: Mealybug wilt. Pathogen: Mealybug wilt virus. 2014. University of Hawaii at Manoa. Mealybug Wilt Virus album. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).  Web. 3 Feb. 2017.
Fig. 9 Nelson, Scot., John Hu. Mealybug wilt of pineapple in Hawaii. 2012. University of Hawaii at Manoa. Mealybug Wilt Virus album. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).  Web. 3 Feb. 2017.

Published 28 Jan. 2014 LR. Last update 3 Mar. 2017 LR
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