Cultural Calendar for Production of Mature Trees



Excerpt from the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida


Operation Jan. Feb. March April May June July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

General1

    The period from March through September is generally the best time to apply granular mixes containing nitrogen-phosphate-potash-magnesium (N-P-K-Mg).      

Nutritional sprays2

   

Apply 2 to 4 nutritional sprays to the leaves anytime from March through October. Sprays should contain magnesium, manganese, zinc, molybdenum, and boron. Follow dilution directions on the label.

   
Iron applications      

The period from April through September-October is generally the most effective time to apply 2 to 4 soil drenches of chelated iron material to high pH, calcareous soils or to apply 2 to 4 soil applications of iron sulfate to acid, sandy soils.

   
Watering

Water trees during after periods of 5 to 7 days or more. Watering during the summer may be unnecessary unless drought conditions prevail. Water less during the winter months (November to February).

Insect control

Monitor the tree for insect infestations year round. Have the insects identified first and contact your local Cooperative Extension Agent for recommended control.

Disease control        

Monitor trees exposed to excessively wet soil conditions for signs of root rot: wilting, leaf yellowing, leaf drop, and stem dieback. Contact your local Cooperative Extension Agent for recommended control.

   
Pruning      

Selectively prune bearing trees during the warmer time of the year to reduce tree height and if necessary, spread of the tree canopy. This should be done annually.

       

1, Examples of dry fertilizer materials include 6-6-6-2, 8-3-9-3, and 4-2-12-2 (N-P-K-Mg).

2, A spreader-sticker may be added to the nutritional spray to help prevent washing off due to rainfall.




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Bibliography

Balerdi, Carlos F., Crane, Jonathan H. and Maguire, Ian. "Mamey sapote Growing in the Florida Home Landscape." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is FC-30, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. First published Apr. 1979. Major revision May 1996 and Sept. 2005. Revised Oct. 2008. Reviewed July 2013. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Web. 12 June 2015.

Published 12 June 2015 LR. Reviewed 26 May 2016 KJ
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