Guava - Psidium guajava L.
Psidium guajava fruit
Fig. 1 magnifying glass
Psidium guajava, Guava fruit bought and photographed in Taiwan

Red guava Psidium guajava.
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Red guava Psidium guajava

Psidium guajava
Fig. 3 magnifying glass

Psidium guajava (Guava). Fruit in half. Olinda, Maui, Hawaii
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Psidium guajava (Guava). Fruit in half. Olinda, Maui, Hawaii

Leaves and bark. Iao Tropical Gardens of Maui, Maui, Hawaii
Fig. 5 magnifying glass
 Psidium guajava (Guava)
Leaves and bark. Iao Tropical Gardens of Maui, Maui, Hawaii

Psidium guajava (Guava). Leaves. Lowes Garden Center Kahului, Maui, Hawaii
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Psidium guajava (Guava). Leaves. Lowes Garden Center Kahului, Maui, Hawaii

Psidium guajava flower
Fig. 10 magnifying glass

Psidium guajava.
Fig. 17 magnifying glass
Psidium guajava, fruit forming

Psidium guajava, guava
Fig. 18 magnifying glass
Psidium guajava, guava

Psidium guajava (fruit) Maui, Makawao
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Psidium guajava (fruit) Maui, Makawao

Psidium guajava (Guava).Habit Olinda, Maui, Hawaii
Fig. 27 magnifying glass
Psidium guajava (Guava).Habit Olinda, Maui, Hawaii

Bark
Fig. 28 magnifying glass

Tronco da árvore de Psidium guajava
Fig. 29 magnifying glass
Tronco da árvore de Psidium guajava

Guava seeds
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Guava, photographed in Bangalore
Fig. 46 magnifying glass
Guavas, photographed in Bangalore

Guava at a fruit stall in Pasar Baru, Jakarta, Indonesia
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Guava at a fruit stall in Pasar Baru, Jakarta, Indonesia

Guava, the juicy, pink, sliced fruit in the center, is high in antioxidants
Fig. 48 magnifying glass
Guava, the juicy, pink, sliced fruit in the center, is high in antioxidants

Many vendors were insistent we take photos of them, obviously proud of their meticulously stack tables of fruits and vegetables. India, Koyambedu Market
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India, Koyambedu Market

Fruit vendor selling guavas at Laad Bazar near Charminar, Hyderabad.
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Fruit vendor selling guavas at Laad Bazar near Charminar, Hyderabad

Estancia La Carlota Corrientes
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Estancia La Carlota Corrientes

Scientific name
Psidium guajava L.
Common names
Guava, guajava, guayaba, jambu biji (Malay), bayabas (Philippino), trapaek sruk (Cambodian), farang, ma-kuai and ma-man (Thai), and oi (Vietnamese) 1
Synonyms
Guajava pumila (Vahl) Kuntze; G. pyrifera (L.) Kuntze; Myrtus guajava (L.) Kuntze; M. guajava var. pyrifera (L.) Kuntze; Psidium angustifolium Lam.; P. cujavillus Burm.f.; P. cujavus L.; P. fragrans Macfad.;  P. guajava var. cujavillum (Burm.f.) Krug & Urb.; P. guajava var. guajava; P. guajava var. minor Mattos; P. guava Griseb.; P. igatemyense Barb.Rodr.; P. igatemyensis Barb. Rodr.; P.intermedium Zipp. ex Blume; P. pomiferum L.; P. pomiferum var. sapidissimum (Jacq.) DC.; P. prostratum O.Berg; P. pumilum Vahl; P. pumilum var. guadalupense DC.; P. pyriferum L.; P. pyriferum var. glabrum Benth.; P. sapidissimum Jacq.; P. vulgare Rich.; Syzygium ellipticum K.Schum. & Lauterb. 7
Relatives
Cattley (Strawberry) guava (Psidium cattleianum), Costa Rican Guava (P. freidlichiana), Brazilian guava (P. guineense), feijoa (Feijoa sellowiana), jambolan (Syzygium jambolanum), Malay apple (S. malaccense), Java apple, wax jambu (S. samarangense), water apple (S. aqueum), rose apple (S. jambos), Surinam cherry (Eugenia uniflora), grumichama (E. brasiliensis), pitomba (E. luschnathiana), and jaboticaba (Myciaria cauliflora) 1
Family
Myrtaceae
Origin
Guava is indigenous to the American tropics
Uses
Fruit; landscape specimen; hedge
Height
20 ft (6.1 m)
Crown
Broad, spreading or upright 1
Plant habit
Arborescent shrub or small tree 3
Growth rate
Very quickly, often three to four feet in a single growing season 6
Longevity
They live 30 to 40 years but productivity declines after the 15th year 2
Trunk/bark/branches
Single or multi trunked; smooth, thin, copper-colored bark that flakes off, showing the greenish layer beneath; young branchlets are quadrangular 3
Pruning requirement
Periodic pruning to improve the shape of the tree is recommended 6
Leaves
Evergreen; large; opposite, oblong; serrated margins; prominent veins on the lower side; 3-7 in. (7.6–18 cm) in length 1
Flower
Showy, white; has perfect flowers (male and female parts in each flower); new growth arising from either lateral buds on older wood or at the ends of shoots 1
Fruit
Round, ovoid, or pyriform; commonly yellow in color; flesh white to deep pink or salmon-red; numerous small, reniform, hard seeds; flavor sweet, musky 3
Season
Harvested in Florida all year long; main seasons are August-October and February-March
USDA Nutrient Content pdf
Light requirement
Full sun to partial shade
Soil tolerances
Moist to dry soil
PH preference
4.5-7.0
Drought tolerance
High
Flood tolerance
Moderate
Wind tolerance
Generally tolerant of windy conditions
Aerosol/soil salt tolerance
Will take some salt spray, but are not recommended for highly exposed locations on seaside or Intracoastal areas 6
Cold tolerance
27-28 °F (-2.78-2.22 °C)
Plant spacing
33 ft (10 m); 16 1/2 ft (5 m) apart is possible if the trees are "hedged" 2
Roots
Trees produced by cuttings and air-layering have shallow root systems
There are some deep roots but no distinct taproot 4
Invasive potential *
Guava has been assessed by the IFAS Invasive Plants Working Group as invasive and not recommended by IFAS for planting in south Florida; guava may be planted in central Florida but should be managed to prevent escape 1
Pest resistance
Guava trees are attacked by a number of insect pests including the Caribbean fruit fly, guava whitefly, red-banded thrips, guava fruit moth, and scales 1
Known hazard
P. guajava has insecticidal properties 4



Reading Material

Guava Growing in the Florida Home Landscape from the University of Florida pdf 8 pages
Tropical Guava from the California Rare Fruit Growers Inc.
Guava from Julia Morton's book Fruits of Warm Climates
The guava from W. Popenoe's book Manual of Tropical and Subtropical Fruits



Origin

The guava originated in the American tropics, probably in Central America. It was widely distributed prior to the arrival of the Europeans. 5

Description
The common guava is easy to grow and tolerates adverse conditions. The tree is attractive and the patchy bark lends visual interest. It bears prolific quantities of fruit. The aromatic fruit is well regarded thhroughout the American tropics and beyond. Unfortunately, the guava is a primary host of the Caribbean fruit fly. In addition, it is classified as an invasive exotic. When making planting decisions, the gardener should weigh these two drawbacks against the guava's many attibutes. 5

Psidium guajava (habit). Location: Maui, Enchanting Floral Gardens of KulaGuava tree at Mounts Botanical Garden FloridaCommon guava seedling, 14 monthsPsidium guajava (Guava). Trunk and bark at Enchanting Floral Gardens of Kula, Maui, Hawaii
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Psidium guajava, seeds wetPsidium guajava, seeds dry
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Fig. 31. Psidium guajava (habit). Location: Maui, Enchanting Floral Gardens of Kula
Fig. 32. Guava tree at Mounts Botanical Garden Florida
Fig. 33. Common guava seedling, 14 months
Fig. 34. Psidium guajava (Guava). Trunk and bark at Enchanting Floral Gardens of Kula, Maui, Hawaii
Fig. 35. Psidium guajava, seeds wet
Fig. 36. Psidium guajava, seeds dry

Leaves
Leaves opposite, simple; stipules absent, petiole short, 3-10 mm long; blade oblong to elliptic, 5-15 x 4-6 cm, apex obtuse to bluntly acuminate, base rounded to subcuneate, margins entire, somewhat thick and leathery, dull grey to yellow-green above, slightly downy below, veins prominent, gland dotted. 4

Guava leafPsidium guajava (Guava). Leaves habit. KiHana Nursery Kihei, Maui, HawaiiLeafbud of common guava (Psidium guajava). Taken at Burdwan, West Bengal, India.
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Fig. 7. Psidium guajava (Guava). Leaves habit. KiHana Nursery Kihei, Maui, Hawaii.
Fig. 8. Leafbud of common guava (Psidium guajava). Taken at Burdwan, West Bengal, India.

Flowers
White, about 1 inch (2.54 cm) in diameter, borne singly or in small groups (cymes) in axils of leaves of recent growth. 1 
Flowers are produced on branchlets of recent growth, and are an inch broad, white, solitary, or several together upon a slender peduncle. The calyx splits into irregular segments; the four petals are oval, delicate in texture. In the center of the flower is a brush-like cluster of long stamens. 3
One of the most critical botanical characteristics of guava is that flowers are borne on newly emerging lateral shoots, irrespective of the time of year. 4

Psidium guajava or Bayabas in Barangay San Franciscoflor de Goiabeira. GOIABA - Guava. (Psidium guajava) Ceret São Paulo. Brazil and Central America native treeGuava flower
Fig. 11 magnifying glass Fig. 12 magnifying glass Fig. 13 magnifying glass
Myrtaceae 桃金孃科 - Guava (Psidium guajava)番石榴Guava flower and budsPsidium guajana flower habit
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Fig. 11. Psidium guajava or Bayabas in Barangay San Francisco (flower buds)
Fig. 12. Flor de Goiabeira. GOIABA - Guava. (Psidium guajava) Ceret São Paulo. Brazil and Central America native tree
Fig. 14. Myrtaceae - Guava (Psidium guajava)
Fig. 15. Psidium guajana flower and flower buds
Fig. 16. Psidium guajana flower habit

Fruit
A berry with few to many small brown seeds. Fruit shape ranges from round, ovoid to pear-shaped. Fruit weight ranges from 1 ounce to 48 ounces (28 g - 1.4 kg). The peel color ranges from green to yellow and flesh color may be white, yellow, pink or red. Fruit peel thickness may be thin or thick and depends upon cultivar. There is a wide range in flavor and aroma, ranging from sweet to highly acid and strong and penetrating aroma to mild and pleasant. 1
When immature and until a very short time before ripening, the fruit is green, hard, gummy within and very astringent.
Fruits are borne by new shoots from mature wood. If trees bear too heavily, the branches may break. Therefore, thinning is recommended and results in larger fruits. The fruit matures 90 to 150 days after flowering. 2
The white fleshed varieties tend to be slightly more acid than the pink or dark colored
varieties. 6

A baby guava, in its budding stagePsidium guajava, immature fruitPsidium guajava (Guava) Indonesian white fruit. Pali o Waipio, Maui, Hawaii.
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Psidium guajavaPsidium guajava (local:Jambu batu) from Indonesia'Vietnamese' Pink Guava'Vietnamese Giant' Guava (Psidium guajava / Myrtaceae) tree at the Kampong, Coconut Grove, Florida. Fruits on the tree and on the ground were all infested with Fruit Flies
Fig. 23 magnifying glass Fig. 24 magnifying glass Fig. 25 magnifying glass Fig. 26 magnifying glass

Fig. 20. A baby guava, in its budding stage
Fig. 21. Psidium guajava, immature fruit
Fig. 22. Psidium guajava (Guava). Indonesian white fruit. Pali o Waipio, Maui, Hawaii
Fig. 23. Psidium guajava, mature fruit
Fig. 24. Psidium guajava (local:Jambu batu) from Indonesia
Fig. 25. 'Vietnamese' Pink Guava
Fig. 26. 'Vietnamese Giant' Guava (Psidium guajava/Myrtaceae) tree at the Kampong, Coconut Grove, Florida. Fruits on the tree and on the ground were all infested with Fruit Flies.

Varieties Page

Because the fruit must be bagged to protect it from the Caribbean fruit fly, preference should be given to large-fruited cultivars: 'Thai Giant', 'White Indian', 'Hong Kong Pink', 'White Indonesian', 'Lucknow 49', 'Red Indian', 'Detwiler', 'Ruby x Supreme', 'Peruvian White ' and 'Supreme'. 5

Harvesting
Guava trees generally begin fruit production 3 to 4 years after planting and yields range from 50 to 80 lbs (23-36 kg) or more per tree per year. In Florida, guava may produce two crops per year; the main crop during summer followed by another smaller crop during early spring. However, through simple pruning techniques fruit may be produced nearly year-round. 1

Pollination
Self-pollination is possible but cross-pollination by insects results in higher yields. 1
The chief pollinator of guavas is the honeybee (Apis mellifera). The amount of cross-pollination ranges from 25.7 to 41.3%. 2
The pollen is viable for up to 42 hours and the stigmas are receptive for about 2 days. 4

Propagation

Guava seeds remain viable for many months. They often germinate in 2 to 3 weeks but may take as long as 8 weeks. Pretreatment with sulfuric acid, or boiling for 5 minutes, or soaking for 2 weeks, will hasten germination. Seedlings are transplanted when 2 to 30 in (5-75 cm) high and set out in the field when 1 or 2 years old. Inasmuch as guava trees cannot be depended upon to come true from seed, vegetative propagation is widely practiced. 2
Veneer and cleft grafting and chip budding are more successful on young vigorous seedling rootstocks. Scion material should be from terminal stem growth which is still green and quadrangular. 1
Seedlings may flower within 2 years; clonally propagated trees often begin to bear during the first year after planting. Trees reach full bearing after 5- 8 years, depending on growing conditions and spacing. 4

A rapid Method of Propagation The Guava from the Sub-Tropical Experiment Station, Homestead, Florida pdf 5 pages

Planting

In general, guava trees should be planted in full sun for best growth and fruit production. Select a part of the landscape away from other trees, buildings and structures, and power lines. Remember guava trees can grow to 20 ft (6.1 m) in height if not pruned to contain their size. Select the warmest area of the landscape that does not flood (or remain wet) after typical summer rainfall events. 1

Guava Growth Progression from Pruning to Harvest from Ian Maguire's Tropical Fruit Photography Archive

Cold tolerance
Trees will be injured by cold weather and will freeze at about 28 degrees F but will come back from the lower portions once the damaged areas are pruned out. 6

Pruning
Light pruning is always recommended to develop a strong framework, and suckers should also be eliminated around the base. 2
Trees that are bearing fruit may be kept small (3 to 6 ft high) through continuous selective pruning and tipping or allowed to grow into slightly larger trees (6 to 12 ft). 1

Off-season fruit production
Pruning may be used to induce off-season flowering and fruit production. Guava trees flower on new succulent, vigorous new growth arising from either lateral buds on older wood or at the ends of shoots. A period of 2–3 weeks without watering and then pruning will force new vegetative growth and flowering. Many times withholding water is not necessary. 1

Fertilizing
In Florida, young guava trees should be fertilized every 1 to 2 months during the first year.
Fertilizer mixtures containing 6 to 10% nitrogen, 6 to 10% available phosphoric acid, 6 to 10% potash, and 4 to 6% magnesium give satisfactory results with young trees. For bearing trees potash should be increased to 9 to 15% and available phosphoric acid reduced to 2 to 4%. Examples of commonly available fertilizer mixes include 6-6-6-2 [6 (N)-6 (P2O5)-6 (K2O)-2 (Mg)] and 8-3-9-2 [8 (N)-3 (P2O5)-6 (K2O)-3 (Mg)]. 1
From spring though summer, trees should receive 3 to 4 annual nutritional sprays of copper, zinc, manganese, and boron. 1

Irrigation

Once guava trees are 2 or more years old irrigation will be beneficial to plant growth and crop yields during prolonged dry periods. The period from bloom and through fruit development is important and drought stress should be avoided at this time with periodic watering. 1

Pests Page
Problems of guava include insects such as caterpillars that attack foliage, scale insects, and the caribbean fruit fly which attacks maturing fruit. 6

Diseases Page

Other Injuries
Some nutritional problems, particularly a lack of minor elements, often occur on highly alkaline soils and trees benefit from periodic applications of nutritional sprays. 6

Potassium deficiency: guavaGuava: Rat feeding injuryGuava: Bird feeding injury to fruit
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Guava (Psidium guajava): Bird feeding injury to fruit.
Fig. 40 magnifying glass

Fig. 37. Potassium deficiency: guava
Fig. 38. Guava: Rat feeding injury
Fig. 39. Guava: Bird feeding injury to fruit
Fig. 40. Guava (Psidium guajava): Bird feeding injury to fruit

Food Uses
Raw guavas are eaten out-of-hand, but are preferred seeded and served sliced as dessert or in salads. More commonly, the fruit is cooked and cooking eliminates the strong odor. Bars of thick, rich guava paste and guava cheese are staple sweets, and guava jelly is almost universally marketed. It is made into sirup for use on waffles, ice cream, puddings and in milkshakes. Guava juice and nectar are among the numerous popular canned or bottled fruit beverages of the Caribbean area. There are innumerable recipes for utilizing guavas in pies, cakes, puddings, sauce, ice cream, jam, butter, marmalade, chutney, relish, catsup, and other products. 2

Psidium guajava (juice from Hawaiian Airlines flight)Guava macaronsRollo de guayaba
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Thumb Print Guava CookiesBeverage factory "Casa Garay", city and province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba
Fig. 44 magnifying glass Fig. 45 magnifying glass

Fig. 41. Psidium guajava (juice from Hawaiian Airlines flight)
Fig. 42. Guava macarons, Mililani, Hawaii, United States
Fig. 43. Rollo de guayaba
Fig. 44. Thumb Print Guava Cookies
Fig. 45. Beverage factory "Casa Garay", city and province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Guayabita literally means 'little guava').

South Florida Tropicals: Guava from the University of Florida pdf

Medicinal Uses **
The roots, bark, leaves and immature fruits, because of their astringency, are commonly employed to halt gastroenteritis, diarrhea and dysentery, throughout the tropics. Crushed leaves are applied on wounds, ulcers and rheumatic places, and leaves are chewed to relieve toothache. The leaf decoction is taken as a remedy for coughs, throat and chest ailments, gargled to relieve oral ulcers and inflamed gums; and also taken as an emmenagogue and vermifuge, and treatment for leucorrhea. It has been effective in halting vomiting and diarrhea in cholera patients. It is also applied on skin diseases. A decoction of the new shoots is taken as a febrifuge. The leaf infusion is prescribed in India in cerebral ailments, nephritis and cachexia. An extract is given in epilepsy and chorea and a tincture is rubbed on the spine of children in convulsions. A combined decoction of leaves and bark is given to expel the placenta after childbirth. 2

Other Uses
The leaves and bark are rich in tannin (10% in the leaves on a dry weight basis, 11-30% in the bark). The bark is used in Central America for tanning hides. Malayans use the leaves with other plant materials to make a black dye for silk. In southeast Asia, the leaves are employed to give a black color to cotton; and in Indonesia, they serve to dye matting. 2

General
From the Greek psidion (pomegranate), due to a fancied resemblance between the two
fruits. 4


Further Reading
Psidium guajava L. from the World Agroforestry Database
Guava, Psidium guajava from Fruitipedia, Encyclopedia of the Edible Fruits of the World
Guava Production from the Archives of the Rare Fruit Council of Australia
Video from the Tropical Fruit Growers of South Florida ext. link
Video on How to Prune a Guava Tree from the Papaya Tree Nursery ext. link
Guava from the Tropical Fruit News, Miami Rare Fruit Council
Guava Botanical Art


List of Growers and Vendors


Bibliography

1 Crane, Jonathan H. and Balerdi, Carlos F. "Guava growing in the Florida Home Landscape".  edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is HS 4, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date Oct. 1979. Reviewed Nov, 2016. Web. 29 June 2017.

2 Morton, J. "Guava". hort.purdue.edu. Fruits of warm climates. p. 356-363. 1987. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.
3 Popenoe, Wilson. "The guava." chestofbooks.com. Manual of Tropical and Subtropical fruits. 1920. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.
4  Orwa C, A Mutua, Kindt R , Jamnadass R, S Anthony. "Psidium guajava L." worldagroforestry.org. Agroforestree Database:a tree reference and selection guide version 4.0. 2009. Web. 1 Feb. 2017.
5 Boning, Charles R. Florida's Best Fruiting Plants- Native and Exotic Trees, Shrubs, and Vines. Pineapple Press, Inc. sarasota, Florida. Print.
6 Joyner, Gene. "Guava." tropicalfruitnews.org. Tropical Fruit News, Miami Rare Fruit Council, Miami Rare Fruit Council Miami Rare Fruit Council Feb. 1994. Web. 2 Feb. 2017.
7 Psidium guajava L. synonyms. The Plant List (2010). Version 1. theplantlist.org. Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Photographs

Fig. 1 Guava fruit bought and photographed in Taiwan. 2004. commons.wikimedia.org. Under GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2. Web. 8 Mar. 2015.
Fig. 2
Argenton, Rodrigo. Red guava Psidium guajava on a black background.. 2014. This media was developed by a Wikinambá Warrior or a partner on behalf of the Illustration Programme. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 4.0). Web. 8 Mar. 2015.

Fig. 3,10,21,23,35,36 Paton, Steve. Psidium guajava. N.d. Environmental Sciences Program, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. stri.si.edu. Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 4 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (Guava). Fruit in half. Olinda, Maui, Hawaii. 2009. starrenvironmental.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 5 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (Guava). Leaves and bark. Iao Tropical Gardens of Maui, Maui, Hawaii. 2012. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 6 Saadkhan12345. Image of Guava plant tree leaf. 2016. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 4.0). Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 7 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (leaves). 2008. Maui, Lowes Garden Center Kahului. starrenvironmental.com.  Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 8 Mar. 2015.

Fig. 8 Joydeep. Leafbud of common guava (Psidium guajava). Taken at Burdwan, West Bengal, India. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 1 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 9 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (leaves). 2008. Maui, Lowes Garden Center Kahului. starrenvironmental.com.  Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 8 Mar. 2015.

Fig. 11 Judgefloro. Psidium guajava or Bayabas in Barangay San Francisco. 2015. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 4.0). Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 12 Mauroguanandi. Flor de Goiabeira. GOIABA - Guava. (Psidium guajava) Ceret São Paulo. Brazil and Central America native tree. 2008.  flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 13 Dec. 2014.

Fig. 13,18 Smith, C.W. Psidium guajava L.. N.d. University of Hawaii, Botany Department, Manoa Campus Plants. botany.hawaii.edu. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.

Fig. 14 Wong, Joseph, Kai Yan, Myrtaceae Guava (Psidium guajava). 2010. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 15 Robitaille, Liette. "Flower and fruit bud, Guava Series." 2014. growables.org. File JPG

Fig. 16 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (Guava). Flower habit. Olinda, Maui, Hawaii. 2009. starrenvironmental.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 17 Mercadante, Mauricio. Psidium guajava. 2013. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 19 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (fruit) Maui, Makawao. 2007. starrenvironmental.comUnder (CC BY 2.0). Web. 8 Mar. 2015.

Fig. 20 Fqamar. A baby guava, in its budding stage. 2008. commons.wikimedia.org. Public Domain. Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 21 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (Guava). Indonesian white fruit. Pali o Waipio, Maui, Hawaii. 2012. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 22 Hariadhi. Psidium guajava (local:Jambu batu) from Indonesia. 2007. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 1 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 23 Hungda. Vietnamese Pink Guava. 2014. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 4.0). Web. 13 Dec. 2014.

Fig. 24 Ghosh, Asit K. Thaumaturgist. 'Vietnamese Giant' Guava (Psidium guajava/Myrtaceae) tree at the Kampong, Coconut Grove, Florida. Fruits on the tree and on the ground were all infested with Fruit Flies. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 4.0). Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 27 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (Guava). Habit Olinda, Maui, Hawaii. 2009. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 28 Vinayaraj. Guava bark. 2012. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0) and  GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2. Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 29 Conrado, Denis A. C. Tronco da árvore de Psidium guajava. 2007. commons.wikimedia.org. Livre com atribuição. Web. 8 Mar. 2015.

Fig. 30 Hurst, Steve. Psidium guajava L. - Seeds. N.d. USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. plants.usda.gov. Web. 13 Dec. 2014.

Fig. 31 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (habit). Maui, Enchanting Floral Gardens of Kula2007. starrenvironmental.comUnder (CC BY 2.0). Web. 8 Mar. 2015.

Fig. 32 Robitaille, Liette. "Guava tree at Mounts Botanical Garden Florida, Guava Series.". 2014. growables.org. File JPG

Fig. 33 Davidals. Common guava seedling, 14 months. 2011. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 1 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 34 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (Guava). Trunk and bark at Enchanting Floral Gardens of Kula, Maui, Hawaii. 2015. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 37 Nelson, Scot. Potassium deficiency: guava. 2003. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 38 Nelson, Scot. Guava: Rat feeding injury. 2016. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 39 Nelson, Scot. Guava (Psidium guajava): Bird feeding injury to fruit. 2016. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.
Fig. 40 Nelson, Scot. Guava: Bird feeding injury to fruit. 2015. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.

Fig. 41 Starr, Forest and Kim. Psidium guajava (juice from Hawaiian Airlines flight). 2008. starrenvironmental.com. Oahu, Honolulu. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 8 Mar. 2015.

Fig. 42 Janine. Guava macarons, Mililani, Hawaii, United States. 2008. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 43 Okrany. Rollo de guayaba. 2008. commons.wikimedia.org. Public Domain. Web. 2 Feb. 2017.
Fig. 44 Hudson, Janet. Thumb Print Guava Cookies. 2010. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 31 Jan. 2017.
Fig. 45 Anagoria. Beverage factory "Casa Garay", city and province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Guayabita (literally means 'little guava'). 2012. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY 3.0). Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 46 Dangi, Rajesh. Guavas, photographed in Bangalore. 2006. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0) and  GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2. Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 47 Midori, Sakurai. Guava at a fruit stall in Pasar Baru, Jakarta, Indonesia. 2006. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 2.1 JP). Web. 13 Dec. 2014.

Fig. 48 Guava, the juicy, pink, sliced fruit in the center, is high in antioxidants. 2007. USDA Agricultural Research Service. commons.wikimedia.org. Public Domain. Web. 13 Dec. 2014.

Fig. 49 Savage, McKay. Many vendors were insistent we take photos of them, obviously proud of their meticulously stack tables of fruits and vegetables. India, Koyambedu Market. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

Fig. 50 Sissssou. Fruit vendor selling guavas at Laad Bazar near Charminar, Hyderabad. 2009. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 2 Feb. 2017.
Fig. 51 Patovish. Estancia La Carlota Corrientes. 2004. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 4.0). Web. 2 Feb. 2017.

UF/IFAS Assessment of Non-native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas
** Information provided is not intended to be used as a guide for treatment of medical conditions.

Published 13 Dec. 2014 LR. Last update 29 June 2017 LR
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